The Man Behind the Forecast

The Man Behind the Forecast

It’s impressive, perhaps even incredible, what Eddie Sheerr has accomplished in just five short years – both personally and professionally. One of the province’s most identifiable faces, he’s endeared himself to an entire province and – with his aw-shucks charm – has been adopted and embraced as one of our own.

Much yet little has changed since Sheerr arrived in Canada’s youngest province in the summer of 2013, relocating from an ABC affiliate in Colorado to join NTV’s award-winning team as the station’s chief meteorologist.

Looking for Adventure

“I was looking for an adventure at the time, and it felt like home as soon as I got there,” he recalls.

Lured by the province’s unpredictable weather patterns – sometimes several seasons in a single day – Mother Nature has not disappointed. Let’s just say the 34-year-old weather whiz has been busy. There have been countless snow storms over the past five years and severe winds that have crippled the province on a couple of occasions. And then there’s rain, like January of this year, which led to severe flooding on the province’s west coast with several communities declaring a state of emergency.  

Heck, in the summer of 2015, the RNC actually slapped him in handcuffs for delivering the coldest July in two decades. He took the fall for the anomalous chill in a classic moment of satire live on NTV, of course. Oh, and with a smile. “He’s such a good sport and I think our viewers appreciate that,” says NTV anchor and senior producer Lynn Burry. “Eddie is a real professional and takes great pride in his work, but he also has a great sense of humor and that resonates with viewers.”

Fascinated by Weather

Sheerr, born and raised just outside Philadelphia, has always been fascinated by weather. His folks actually remember a tiny, pre-school Eddie Sheerr digging a ruler into freshly-fallen snow to measure its depth. He took that passion all the way to college, earning a bachelor of science in meteorology from Plymouth State University – eventually plying his trade at U.S. stations before finding his real work home at NTV.

“I love my job. Yes, It can be challenging at times and each day presents something new but it’s the people that makes my career so rewarding,” he says. “You meet the nicest people everywhere you turn.” Although Sheerr is one of the busiest professionals in the industry – from a major presence on social media and radio work to his primary residence starring on NTV News – he’s also accomplished plenty away from the station. Truth is, the island’s salt sea, as the song goes, is a perfume to his soul. He appears at home and has embraced our culture, cuisine and all that’s great about this unique island in the middle of the Atlantic.

Regatta Die-Hard

He’s jigged cod and loves a run on the quad at the cabin. He loves moose sausages, a slice of bologna and spends his Sunday mornings singing along to the best Irish and traditional tunes on OZFM’s Jigs and Reels. “Well, trying to sing,” he jokes.

He’s run the historic Tely 10 Road Race that stretches from Paradise to Bannerman Park (crossing the finish line in a very respectable  90 minutes), plays beer league hockey,  and spends much of his spare time training for the second love of his life – the Royal St. John’s Regatta (more on his true love in a little bit). Sheerr is a Regatta die-hard, hauling oar for one of the top crews at Quidi Vidi. His NTV men’s crew – which also features work pals Donnie and Dexter Decker, as well as coach Tony Barrington  – have been a perennial contender over the past several summers. He narrowly lost the Placentia Regatta in 2018, less than two seconds behind the hometown champs in the final.

“That one stung because we were so close to winning our first championship as a crew,” says Sheerr, who also lends his hand as a coxswain, steering Team Broken Earth to a top finish in a late morning race. And the rowing dream continues with a big season ahead.

Suzie Sheerr

Sheerr’s real prize, though, was won in 2015 when he met a beautiful girl from Bishops Falls, Susan Eddy. She’s now Susan Sheerr although some joke it’s really Susan Eddy-Sheerr or Suzie Sheerr – a variation of names that are almost as cute as they are as a couple. They met in early 2015, were engaged later that year and married on Dec. 30, 2016. 

“She’s incredible and I’m so lucky,” says Sheerr, noting the happy couple enjoy visiting family and friends in her central Newfoundland home. “I love everything about her.” Both busy professionals, they’re hoping to grow their little family and want to do so right here in this province.

Busy Winter Season 

Sheerr, of course, is preparing for another busy winter season with loyal viewers tuning in for what’s ahead. No matter what type of winter we get in Newfoundland and Labrador, the weather always presents a challenge. The most challenging weather patterns, he says, are ones where differing air masses are in play. “This creates the areas of snow, rain, freezing rain and ice pellets,” he says. “It can be difficult to pin down who sees what in situations like that. It’s only a matter of time we get our first taste of winter for the season.”

Speaking of the winter, Sheerr is often asked by people about the long range forecast. “Long range forecasts are something I tend not to put much stock into. It’s hard for me to say if we’re going to have a milder, colder or snowier winter than normal,” he says. “Studies have shown that EL Nino and La Nina pattern in the equatorial pacific have very little correlation with weather pattern in our region,” he adds. “I like to take it five days at a time.”

‘Eddie My Love’

Last year, Sheerr says most of the island got off a little easy during the cold season with snowfall being below normal. “Although the snow in June was a bit ridiculous,” he says. “ Averages are averages for a reason; and with below normal snowfall last winter, I wouldn’t be surprised if some places see significantly more snow than normal this winter.”

Much has changed for Eddie Sheerr since he arrived at NTV in 2013. He’s evolved into one of the province’s most trusted on-air talents. Heck, the New Symphony Orchestra even serenaded him last week with an incredible version of, you guessed it, “Eddie My Love” – a Grease-like performance  fronted by the brilliant Dana Parsons. “That was incredible,” he says. “I was speechless.”

Sheerr says he’s also looking forward to spending more time on the road in the coming weeks with special visits to communities in central and western Newfoundland . “It’s been such a great five years and I’m looking forward to what’s ahead,” he says.

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