Women of Hope – Spreading Awareness

Women of Hope – Spreading Awareness

Founded out of necessity, Women of Hope Ovarian Cancer NL aims to spread awareness on a disease that is often forgotten in the mainstream

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Every year 2,800 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer in Canada. According to Ovarian Cancer Canada, only 2.1 per cent of all donations for cancer are directed towards ovarian cancer. Folks like Susan Glynn, a familiar name to long-time Herald readers, are looking to raise awareness for a disease often lost in the mainstream. 

Glynn is the founder of Women of Hope Ovarian Cancer NL. Glynn, who continues to bravely fight her own battle with ovarian cancer, created the organization in 2016 as a means of support for those suffering from the disease. Today they have received notoriety on an international level. 

Becoming informed 

“Our mission in Women of Hope is to offer support to the patient, their families, and friends,” Glynn shared in a statement to The Herald. “We ARE in this together! We advocate and bring awareness about this disease.

“With the thousands of females I have connected with from around the world who battle Ovarian cancer, the need for better support for these patients is paramount,” Glynn says. “Many do not have support, only from groups like Women of Hope. We need more awareness campaigns too because it is a fatal cancer and as females, we need to be informed. Many who get diagnosed are at late-stage and the stats do not look good for survival.”

Glynn and the Women of Hope launch an awareness campaign through the month of September. On September 9th a flag was hung at City Hall with a proclamation declaring the month as Ovarian Cancer Awareness month. Flags were hung outside of Signal Hill, Government House, The Rooms and Torbay Town Hall. 

On September 15th the group, in conjunction with the Running Room, will take part in Walk For Awareness, which begins at 3 p.m. at Quidi Vidi. The following day government buildings in the city will light up teal, which is the official colour that represents ovarian cancer.

Glynn knows too well the uphill battle that those diagnosed with ovarian cancer face. She has taken to competing in runs and marathons as a way to push her body and spirit.

“I have completed 40 rounds of chemotherapy and am now doing radiation therapy,” she shares. “My battle continues with Ovarian cancer. I am standing up to this disease and being an advocate too. I just finished my 8th Tely 10 road race…I walked those ten miles. It was a big challenge but I never gave up.”

Those seeking more information on the disease are encouraged to visit ovariancancercanada.ca. For support, Women of Hope is there to help.

‘Silent killer’ 

“It’s time for females to understand the importance of being informed about this cancer,” Glynn says. “It’s listed in the top five for females as being fatal. Many do not know about this disease which is referred to as a ‘silent killer.’ As females who battle ovarian cancer we are going to be silent no more! Our voices and advocacy will be heard around the world.”

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