NL MUSIC | Jayne Batstone Dives in to Line Art

NL MUSIC | Jayne Batstone Dives in to Line Art

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Rising singer-songwriter Jayne Batstone stakes her claim as a must-watch musical prospect, breaking down her latest EP Line Art in our album deep dive series

Rising singer-songwriter Jayne Batstone continues to impress both curious music observers, critics and newcomers alike with her latest EP Line Art.

Born and raised in St. John’s, Batstone has been surrounded by music and the arts her whole life, becoming a multi-talented singer/songwriter, actor, dancer, advocate and ally.

Featuring Chris Batstone, Wade Tarling, Chris LeDrew, Adam Staple, Sean Panting and Alison Batstone, the EP features the hit single I Won’t Say It, which climbed the charts of the station CIOE and won the junior music category at the 2020 Arts & Letters competition.

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Batstone caught up with The Herald in the latest in our album deep dive series for an expansive and in-depth look into her latest, personal collection of songs. 

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Teenagers is about being a teen in these crazy times. While in high school, I missed school for protests that were organized by my peers, had to do online school for over half of my high school experience. This song is trying to show that chaos.

I Won’t Say It is about that feeling that you get in new relationships. You feel like you are falling for them but you’re not sure, and you don’t want to say it yet because it might ruin everything.  It’s a song about being afraid of losing someone you barely know.

Pastel Angst is about getting older.  Each verse highlights a part of my life, starting as being eight, then junior high, then high school.  

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It’s about wanting to hold onto things like the colour of your childhood rooms walls. It’s walking away from the drama that is getting older and going to do something that’s more childish.

Digital Date is about trying to maintain a relationship online.  During lockdown, I pretty much stopped talking to my friends online for about a week because I wasn’t used to only talking through my phone, but I got into the routine and learned ways of keeping my close relationships without seeing them in person, like we all did.

Celestial is different from the rest of my songs because it doesn’t really have a set message behind it.  

Some people have told me that it sounds like a breakup or moving on from something, others say it’s getting through a tough time.  I think that it’s up to the listener. Whatever you take away from it is your own message. None are correct or incorrect, it’s yours.

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Dillon Collins is a writer based out of St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador. Multi-time MusicNL nominee for Media Person of the Year. Lover of heavy metal, hoppy beverages and the loveable canine.

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